My interest in butterflies grew from the many hours I've spent in the field birding. At first, it was just knowing what was flying in the parks I frequented. Before long curiosity grew to learning about brood numbers,  flight times, host plants and life cycles. Butterflies are also excellent subjects for photography, another of my passions. The rest is history, as they say.

 We moved away from Maryland in July, 2007, bringing a premature end to my search and desire to learn all I could about Maryland butterflies so this section is by no means complete. I do want to share what I've gleaned with anyone who might be interested in the butterflies of this beautiful state, hence these pages.

My first recorded sighting of a butterfly in Maryland was a Zebra Swallowtail (Eurytides marcellus) in April 1998 at the beach area of Flag Ponds Park in Calvert County. This was quickly followed by an Eastern Tiger Swallowtail and a Monarch. A few years later, I began planting native hostplants in my yard and that same year I raised some Monarch butterflies. Since that time, I've collected eggs from and reared 24 species of butterflies, all documented through photographs.

Click on the above map to see the counties (represented by colors) where I have observed or photographed butterflies. Many of my photographs were taken in Calvert County parks where I made most of my field observations as well as the adjacent Anne Arundel County parks (Jug Bay Wetlands Sanctuary).

The two butterflies on the above logo are the Zebra Swallowtail (left), the County Butterfly of Calvert County and the Baltimore Checkerspot (right), the State Butterfly of Maryland.

The  Species List (link below) is comprised of Maryland butterflies I have photographed. If you are looking for a particular species, start here. If you want to look at thumbnails photos, go to the "Fast Browse Plates". The photos are organized in taxonomic order. Clicking on the name in the "Species List" or on a  thumbnail in the "Fast Browse Plates" will bring up more photos if available. Click on either of the links below:

species list    fast browse plates

The Range Map shows the geographic distribution for each of the butterfly species described. Click on the thumbnail map below to see a larger version.

 

The following references were consulted for information on occurrence, range, flight and hostplants:

Special thanks to Dr. Richard H. Smith, Maryland's current butterfly authority, for inspiration, guidance and thought-provoking discussion as I traveled along the path to the discovery of these fascinating insects.

Arlene Ripley